Donald Trump Meets Pope Francis

The President of the United States will soon continue a now well-established practice of meeting the leader of Roman Catholicism at his magnificent world headquarters, Vatican City. The eyes of the world’s press will be watching closely, because on the surface at least, the two leaders appear to have little in common—religiously, politically, or personally. There will be a certain soap opera appeal to at least some observers. A brash, outspoken, even belligerent American President will meet a gentle pontiff who visits the poor in their homes and calls for peace and unity. 

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Five Popular Myths about Last Generation Theology

In certain circles of contemporary Adventism, what has come to be known in recent years as Last Generation Theology has become an epithet. Punctuated with quotation marks, dismissive scorn, and the taint of implied extremism, this belief is noted by certain ones as an example of a thought system which Biblically informed, theologically mature, and spiritually balanced Adventists should rightfully shun.

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A House Divided Shall Fall

The year was 73 B.C. Rome was stirred with the news of a vast gladiator army running free through the Italian countryside. For centuries the Romans had held gladiator competitions, pitting men against animals as well as other men. Gladiators were usually drawn from slaves, people whom the Romans captured in their various conquests. Today one of the most iconic and recognizable monuments of Rome are the remains of the Roman Colosseum, where perhaps thousands perished in the name of blood sport.

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Three Co-Eternal Persons

Anti-Trinitarianism is starting again to make headway in certain circles of conservative Adventism. Typically, those drawn to these views adhere to—or find themselves attracted to—one or both of the following theories: 1) That Jesus, at some distant point in eternity past, was brought forth (or begotten) by the Father. 2) That the Holy Spirit is not a separate divine Person, but is rather the spiritual presence of the Father and the Son. 

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The Freeway, Speeding Tickets, and God’s Grace

As we drive down the freeway, street or road, we see signs which tell us the speed limit is 65, 55, 45, or 35 miles per hour, or whatever those who seem to know have determined is the maximum safe speed for that roadway. It's a law that should be obeyed. Most of us, however, take it for granted that the officer whose duty it is to help us obey that law will give us 4 or 5 over that limit before stopping us and writing a speeding ticket. We are assuming, and counting on, a certain amount of grace before the penalty is given.

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Message and Mission

The fear that religious controversy inside the church holds the potential for distracting its leaders and members from their mission to the world is an age-old concern, especially when the body of Christ finds itself acutely rent by doctrinal or moral divisiveness. As the Seventh-day Adventist Church today confronts a variety of theological and moral disagreements, concern that the church might experience the distraction noted above has become especially serious among thoughtful persons at all levels of denominational life.

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Righteousness by Faith and the Questions on Doctrine Controversy, Part I

A rift has opened in the Seventh-day Adventist Church that has been here for over half of a century. It began when two inquirers from the evangelical world, Donald Barnhouse and Walter Martin, met with a few Seventh-day Adventist leaders to ask questions about our faith. Among those leaders were W. E. Read, Roy Allan Anderson, and L. E. Froom. Among Martin’s special concerns were Seventh-day Adventist teachings regarding the atonement, the human nature of Christ, and salvation.

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Two Conflicting Gospels

A recent article in an independent Adventist magazine has drawn attention to the continuing struggle over the scope and the meaning of the Biblical gospel in the Seventh-day Adventist Church (1).The article defines this struggle over the gospel in contemporary Adventism as taking place between what it calls the “gospel of grace” taught by Martin Luther and classic Protestantism, and what it calls the “gospel of character development,” which in the article’s view is a “variation of the Roman Catholic tenet of salvation by works” (2). The article uses both Scripture and the writings of Ellen White to articulate its stance.

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